Melbourne Education Program

Tuesday 18th May

  ROOM 1
9:00-9:30

 

standUP for Yourself! – Luke Meighan – Invacare Australia/New Zealand 

The clinical benefits of standing are well documented, our bodies were not designed to sit! This presentation will introduce you to the features and benefits of standUP Maxx on the Rovi A3 powerchair. The standUP Maxx combines a power standing function with a full range of power positioning options on the Rovi A3 mid-wheel drive base, delivering a compact footprint and tight turning radius and gives the end user a unique combination of independence, function and accessibility.

10:00-11:00

 

NDIS Presentation

 

11:15-12:00

 

High Standards: An overview of the standards, products and practices that promote safe restraint options for Australian children with disability and medical conditions travelling in motor vehicles – Helen Lindner & Lisa Vale – MACA

Australian research shows that that 61% of allied health professionals do not have access to AS/NZS 4370 – the standard for the transport of children with disability and medical conditions, and 30% are unaware it existed. This presentation will outline this and other standards that promote the safe transportation of children with disability in motor vehicles. It will also provide an overview of the important work Mobility and Accessibility for Children in Australia (MACA) is doing to address the policy, research, product and practice gaps in this area, including a product safety assessment program (supported by the TAC) and national website.

 

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

Active Controls Center Drive; The Biomechanical Benefits – Lauren Hunter – Linds Rehabilitation Equipment

The Clinical Study completed by Moss Rehabilitation Hospital’s Medical Director, Dr Alfredo Esquenazi, is the basis upon which Active Controls can make claims of both preventing and amending muscular skeletal conditions for power wheelchair drivers. Traditional power wheelchairs use an armrest mounted joystick controller. Such devices force a change in body posture and weight distribution with deleterious effects over time. However, driving from midline can facilitate improved power wheelchair control and body posture allowing seating products to do what they are intended to do. The Active Controls Center Drive System was developed to allow midline mounting for power chair joysticks and alternative drive controls. There are several benefits to operation of PWC at midline, including postural alignment, weight distribution and improved operator intuition and functional position that aligns the visual field with the center of the chair’s travel path.

14:00-14:30

 

Successful manual wheelchair assessment and prescription – It’s all how you configure it – Amy Bjornson – Sunrise Medical

Picking the manual wheelchair frame is really just the start.   To truly maximize mobility and long-term health and functionality, configuration or “set up” is just as critical. Additionally, appropriate options and accessories can make all the difference between an unhappy wheelchair user and a truly remarkable outcome.  This instructional course will outline how to select the most appropriate base, configuration and options. We’ll consider after-market seating systems and how this needs to be considered during the assessment.  Case studies will improve therapist confidence and understanding

15:00-15:30 Assistive Technology in Australia: an update from ARATA – Libby Callaway – ARATA 
15:30-16:00

AT Developments

16:00-16:30

Mobile shower commode chairs and bidets / smart toilets – getting it right! – David Fagan – Raz Design Inc

Bidets and smart toilets can improve access, independence, and privacy in toileting. Some bidet / smart toilet users also need mobile shower commodes for toileting and personal hygiene activities. This session focuses on challenges of assessing mobile shower commode chairs used in conjunction with bidets / smart toilets. The session draws on experiences of bidet and mobile shower commode chair suppliers and includes case study examples highlighting different product combinations and design considerations. The session includes guidance on environmental assessments and measurements needed to get it right.

Tuesday 13th October

  ROOM 2
9:00-9:30

 

Electric Wheelchairs and Mobility Scooters In the Wild: Users’ Resilience and Innovation – Dr Theresa Harada, Research Fellow – University of Wollongong

This presentation will discuss the empirical findings from one stage of an ARC Linkage project that investigates the use of electric wheelchairs and mobility scooters. We illustrate the ways that people who used electric wheelchairs and mobility scooters were accommodated for in the council planning approach of local infrastructure in Ballina, NSW, Australia. This has resulted in Ballina becoming a popular retirement destination and being dubbed ‘scooter heaven’ by locals. Despite this focus on providing accessible infrastructure, there were examples of inequalities and unequal access for some groups. These inequalities sometimes positioned people as advocates for change.

 

10:00-11:00

 

Motorised Mobility Device use: Interventions to enhance user safetyDr Marilyn Di Stefano – Road Safety Victoria

People with limited walking capacity can use Motorised Mobility Devices (MMDs) including powered wheelchairs to enhance their ability to meet personal, social, medical and other needs. However, using the device safely must be a pre-requisite to ensure both rider and community safety. A health framework approach to MMD use can include user suitability assessment, MMD prescription and training, and ongoing review. We undertook a literature review and stakeholder consultation to better understand these inteventions. We subsequently identified gaps in resources and tools to support evidence-based assessment, prescription and review processes. This presentation will: (a) provide background information on MMD safety issues, (b) report on our action research approaches including surveys, (c) explain how we established content validity for tools and updated resources, and (d) present project deliverables which are ready to be trialled by both consumers and health practitioners.

11:15-12:15

 

Taking a Stand: Overcoming Obstacles to Improve Outcomes – Rachel Fabiniak – Permobil

As humans we are designed to stand; not just stand occasionally but spend most of our days standing. Over the last several years the media has been littered with articles discussing the negative effects of prolonged sitting and the benefits of standing. Standing desks and terminals now have a presence in the workplace, so why are we still asking our clients to sit? Ongoing studies have continued to investigate the cost of prolonged sitting of our clients and how the benefit of standing may reduce the cost of ongoing healthcare needs. Despite this ongoing research, funding of standing devices continues to be a challenge. In this session we will review the benefits of standing both medical and functional, the ongoing cost of sitting, and how to decipher the current portfolio of standing devices and how to justify them.

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

The Physical, Social and Psychosocial benefits of playing wheelchair sport – Wayne McNamara – Invacare

Learn how wheelchair sport can improve your life, or that of your clients. Discover the surprising benefits that arise and how what you do on a court or track, transfers to life away from it. Realise the social and physical benefits you achieve being surrounded and encouraged by like-minded people that will give you confidence and improve your life. Learn how in 2020 there are a variety of wheelchair sports grants available, and discover some tips about how NDIS funding can give you access to these chairs.

14:00-14:30

 

Restraint or Postural Support – An essential part of the solution or a safety afterthought? – Tracee-lee Maginnity – Permobil

Whilst a generic blanket of “restraint” terminology has been historically associated with the fitting and use of pelvic support belts and harnesses, we will explore the current definitions of restrictive practice and restraint to guide our clinical reasoning processes. How do we differentiate between using a pelvic belt as a support, safety belt or restraint? Why do we need to make this differentiation? How can a pelvic belt assist in providing postural support? These questions and more will be discussed throughout the session.

The session will look at various seated positions and how these impact function. Attendees will be empowered to leave with the tools to continue exploratory learning and understanding of how and where pelvic belts are fitted and integrated into the overall seating solution.

15:00-15:30

 

Manual Wheelchair Skills to Improve Safety, Efficiency and Accessibility – Curtis Palmer – Ottobock Australia

Manual wheelchair skills are a critical, yet often overlooked area where improvements can be made to an individual’s independence, safety and efficiency. While hospitals and peer support groups do a great job of furthering wheelchair skills, many individuals exist outside this system and would still benefit from identifying bad habits or learning new techniques.

This presentation covers proper propulsion technique through to safety tips and overcoming advanced obstacles. With live and pre-recorded demonstrations of the correct and incorrect technique, this presentation is sure to be as entertaining and it is informative, one not to be missed.

16:00-16:30

 

Manual Wheelchair Scripting – Why Compromise Is a Good Thing – Curtis Palmer – Ottobock Australia

A contentious statement: A chair that is scripted as stable as possible, as light as possible or with every accessory possible may be a red flag that someone isn’t seeing the whole picture. Scripting a manual wheelchair is unique in that almost everything is a compromise.

The most stable chair is often one that is hard to propel, the most lightweight options are often less robust, and the chair with every feature for functionality can become too heavy to be functional. Using live and pre-recorded demonstrations we will explore manual wheelchair scripting to find the best outcome for your client.

  ROOM 3
9:00-9:30

 

Anatomy of a Wheelchair: Clinical Implications – Tina Roesler – Motion Composites

10:00-10:45

 

Understanding Vehicle Solution Assessments – Amin Akbarian – Mobility Engineering

Throughout the journey inside of the vehicle we may either be a driver or a passenger, then if you are a passenger the position within the vehicle can differ depending on your preference.  All of this then needs to be done in a way that is safe, meets the Road Transport regulations and suits our needs.

This session will explore the various vehicle solutions available on the market and matching them to participants specific transport needs.  Throughout each vehicle section there will be an overview of the relevant regulations and standards with their applicability criteria.

11:15-12:00

 

Identification, Prevention and Measurement of Postural Asymmetry in Adults with Cerebral Palsy – Carlee Holmes – St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne And Monash University

Non-ambulant adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are vulnerable to spinal, pelvic and hip asymmetry. Unsupported static postures for prolonged periods contribute to body shape distortion with secondary complications including pain, pressure injury risk and contracture. Understanding the influence of gravity and sleeping position on a person’s potential body shape distortion is important in prevention and remediation of postural asymmetry.

The GIofBS is a clinical tool providing measures of Windsweeping Index, thoracic shape and symmetry and hip external rotation / abduction calculation. These measures enable objective documentation of posture at an impairment based level in those with severe physical disability.

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

Let’s talk about toileting! – David Fagan – Raz Design Inc

Toileting is a remarkably complex activity! Toileting can involve a range of activities and tasks including positioning over the aperture, opening and managing bowels, passing urine, maintaining personal hygiene, and managing menstruation. In this session, we’ll review evidence on toileting, and discuss common and not-so-common activities and tasks associated with toilet use. We’ll also discuss the implications for assessing and specifying assistive technologies for toileting, with a particular focus on mobile shower commode chairs. We’ll conclude with an overview of assessing usability and other person-centered and person-reported outcomes of assistive technology interventions for toileting.

14:00-14:30

 

Assistive Technology Peer Mentoring Program – Neil Berrick and Kate Martinez – ILA

AT Chat is piloting an AT Peer Mentoring program, which will partner a service user (Mentee) with an expert AT user with lived AT and disability experience (AT Peer Mentor). The pilot program will consult both the Mentee and AT Peer Mentor about their experiences throughout the program and gather their valuable feedback on the program as part of AT Chat’s Living Lab methodologies and commitment to co-design. AT chat will present findings from the co-design methodologies and hear from an Mentor and Mentee about their experiences delivering and receiving AT peer mentoring.

15:00-15:30

 

The When, Why, and How of Paediatric Powered Mobility – Rachel Fabiniak – Permobil

When infants and young children with mobility impairments are not provided access to self-directed mobility at the same time as their age matched peers, delays may be seen in cognitive, perceptual, social and motor development. It is imperative that wheeled mobility solutions be introduced as early as possible for this population to prevent long term delays. Historically, some healthcare professionals, funding sources and/or family members have been hesitant to initiate powered mobility, particularly at very young ages for fear of limiting potential gains.

This session will discuss power mobility options and the theory behind powered mobility for the early intervention population. What is best practice in paediatric powered mobility? How do you balance function, development, and posture? What training techniques are utilised to aid in a successful outcome? Available literature and case examples will be utilised to address these and other common questions.

16:00-16:30

 

The Power of Touch – Luke Meighan – Invacare Australia/New Zealand

Think all powered wheelchairs are programmed the same? Think again!

Touch screen technology is used daily on devices such as smartphones, thanks to Invacare this smart technology has now been encompassed into powerchairs with the introduction of the LiNX REM400.

The presentation will review the features and benefits of the LiNX system, including the innovative programming through its ‘live’ function. Changes can be made to the forward, reverse and turn speeds whilst the powerchair is being driven by the user.

The MyLinx App is also available for the end user to view detailed information about their chair, including battery levels and diagnostic information.

*Details subject to change

  ROOM 4
9:00-9:30

 

How do people actually use their manual wheelchairs and what really matters -David Fagan – Ki Mobility

Every manual wheelchair user would like their chair to be a high-performance machine. Performance is impacted by principles involved in translating human movement into movement of a wheelchair and factors that contribute to energy loss. In order to help end users achieve maximum performance, persons involved in the wheelchair selection process need to have a fundamental understanding of how people use their wheelchairs, and how those wheelchairs function.
This presentation will examine the real-world behaviors of manual wheelchair users and discuss the mechanical principles and factors that affect propulsion efficiency. In addition to explaining some details of the science involved, we hope to inspire participants to think critically about their current understandings and beliefs on this topic.

10:00-10:45

 

A novel device to assist computer access and control for people with hand impairment David Hobbs – Flinders University

People living with physical disability, age-related hand impairment or arthritis sometimes struggle to use and operate a computer mouse. To overcome this problem, we have designed a novel device named ‘i-boll’, which not only works as a computer gaming controller, but also as a computer mouse. i-boll removes the need for fine motor control and finger dexterity and can be used as a comfortable mouse alternative, either on your desktop or your lap.

11:15-12:00

 

Myth; Pressure mapping is only used to compare cushions – Dr Barend Ter Haar

Pressure mapping is a technology that has been in use for more than 30 years, and over that time the technology has evolved so that now it is as easy to use routinely as measuring blood pressure. And, like the latter, the technology provides clinical information that cannot normally be accessed without the technology.
A valuable use of pressure mapping is to visualise whither the pressure has been redistributed as a consequence of seat and positioning adjustments. Pressure mapping allows you to see the optimum set up of the different parts of the chair – foot supports, arm supports, back support, etc – for optimal pressure redistribution. Also, using the ‘gradient’ view, the user can see the areas at greatest risk from shear strain.
This course covers what you can and what you cannot learn from using pressure mapping in clinical practice, and where, in combination with clinical experience improved clinical outcomes are achieved.

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

Pediatric Power – Steve Seal – Quantum

14:00-14:30

 

Changes to the regulation of assistive technologyRachel Croome and Rebecca Bateson – Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA)

An update from the TGA on the latest regulatory changes impacting the assistive technology sector including:

  • An overview of the personalised medical devices framework that commenced on 25 February, including its impact on the regulation of custom-made medical devices; and
  • Information about the proposed exclusion of assistive technology devices under changes to the Therapeutic Goods (Excluded Goods) Determination 2018.

 

15:00-15:30

 

How people with leg paralysis benefit from the latest Knee-Ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) technology – Vladislav Marek – Ottobock

KAFO technology has recently undergone tremendous improvements!
This presentation will introduce innovations that are helping improve mobility of people after Spinal Cord Injuries, Polio-myelitis, Multiple Sclerosis and other neuromuscular diseases.
Particular focus of this presentation is on stories of people who are benefiting from the world’s first Swing & Stance Control Orthosis called C-Brace. This KAFO system has the ability to allow users to walk naturally and safely on uneven terrain, down stairs step-over-step, and even to walk backwards.
C-Brace is an innovative product that is available in Australia and has been funded by NDIS for suitable candidates.

16:00-16:30

 

Safe temperature showers made simple – TBC

Clinical Instructional Short Session

Clinical Plenary Long Session

Consumer

Product Innovation

AT Developments

Wednesday 19th May

  ROOM 1
9:00-9:45 TBA – Tom Eley –  OT Solutions 
10:00-10:30

 

Wearable technology innovations for people with vision and literacy impairments – Stewart Andrews – Quantum Reading Learning Vision

Low vision is irreversible for many patients and constitutes a disability. When no treatment is available, technological developments can help patients in their daily lives. NDIS has recently brought about an influx of new vision and hearing technologies. Innovative solutions like OrCam MyEye (portable artificial vision device) for reading and recognising faces and OrCam Hear (first artificial intelligence device for hearing impairments), and the Acesight virtual reality device are being increasingly used in schools, at home, and in the workplace.

Wearable Technologies are, thus, becoming an everyday mainstream tool. The benefits of wearable technologies seem obvious: small, worn discreetly, and store data in the device to respect privacy. Yet, they remain poorly understood and technology innovation often exceeds pragmatic clinical demand. Our presentation will overview the current and emerging wearable technologies, and their use by people with vision and hearing impairments. The awareness of the modern wearable technologies will provide Occupational Therapists with a more complete assessment competency.

11:00-11:45

 

OT’s Exploring Assistive Technology – Assessment, Prescription, Process and Funding – A panel facilitated by OT Australia

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

Prescribing Dynamic Manual Wheelchairs for Function and Independence – Lauren Hunter – Linds Rehabilitation Equipment

Years of research has highlighted the sedentary complications that come to individuals with prolonged wheelchair use; including pressure area development and reduced tolerance to being in the wheelchair due to pain and postural abnormalities. The ability to change the end users position in a manual wheelchair using tilt in space technology to improve posture (20degree tilt) and off load pressure (45degree tilt) is not a new concept; however, therapists now have a range of model options available on the market to select the product for prescription based on the features and end user benefits; instead of defaulting to the familiar. Dynamic wheelchair seating and hardware options has taken on many forms in recent years, giving end users endless opportunities for movement within their manual wheelchairs. Dynamic wheelchair components are designed to absorb and diffuse force, protecting both the end user and the wheelchair seat and frame from damage. Join us to learn more about dynamic wheelchair prescription for function and independence.

14:00-14:30

 

Lessons learned from remote health monitoring trials during COVID-19 lockdown A new approach to transfer – Tim Carroll – HalleyAssist

HalleyAssist® Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered remote health monitoring platform was trialled for user acceptance of technology, performance of AI and alerts and assessment of economic benefits. The trial was funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health Home Support Program and included a research team from Baptcare, National Ageing Research Institute (NARI), Swinburne Institute of Technology, Victoria University and Halley Assist®. The trial hardware installation commenced in Melbourne during the 3rd week of February 2020, shortly before the COVID-19 lockdown occurred.

The lockdown affected the trial participants and their families with increased levels of health concerns. Despite these sentiments and concerns, the research team managed to complete planned installations and include survey questions on how COVID-19 lockdown restrictions changed perceptions of technology, loneliness, and mobility.

The trial outcomes demonstrated that the unobtrusive design, lack of the need for wearable devices and the technology’s lack of requirement for input from users for operation delivered positive responses from users and family members and carers. Significant perception shifts were reported on the use of monitoring technology assisting and prolonging independent living.

During the trial falls and significant behavioural changes, identified by the AI system, were successfully detected and reported to carers.  The technology was accepted by CHSP clients and their family. Families reported their appreciation of the benefits that unobtrusive sensor-based monitoring could have in supporting independence for their loved ones and in delivering peace of mind for their family. No concerns were reported around usability, privacy, or security. Significant health outcomes and financial benefits were reported in the independent Health Economics report.

Wednesday 14th October

  ROOM 2
9:00-9:30

 

Innovations in mobile shower commode chair design – David Fagan – Raz Design Inc

Bidets and smart toilets can improve access, independence, and privacy in toileting. Some bidet / smart toilet users also need mobile shower commodes for toileting and personal hygiene activities. This session focuses on challenges of assessing mobile shower commode chairs used in conjunction with bidets / smart toilets. The session draws on experiences of bidet and mobile shower commode chair suppliers and includes case study examples highlighting different product combinations and design considerations. The session includes guidance on environmental assessments and measurements needed to get it right.

10:00-10:30

 

Assistive Technology in Australia: an update from ARATA – Natasha Layton – ARATA

This presentation will provide a range of free and accessible information and resources for people using assistive technology (AT), as well as those advising, supplying, developing or educating in the area of AT. As Australia’s peak body for assistive technology stakeholders, ARATA Board Members will use the World Health Organisation’s AT priority areas of people, products, provision, personnel, policy and place to outline current Australian AT practice considerations, as well as to share the knowledge and perspectives of people using, and advising on, AT. Best practice approaches and issues relating to AT will be discussed, and strategies to connect with others within existing AT communities will be detailed.

11:00-11:45

 

How to Choose the Right Personal Alarm…..And get Nan to Wear It – Lance Stracke – Guardian Safety Pendants 

Learn what’s happened. . .

  • With the 2 primary technologies used by all safety alert systems;
  • To cause Choice® to stop recommending any personal alarms;
  • Since Telstra’s announcement that the 3G network will be closing;

Learn why. . .

  • Size matters – one size does not fit all;
  • Most mobility and seniors aid retailers don’t sell emergency alert devices;
  • Models that look alike may be very different on the inside;

Learn. . .

  • Tips to win over the bah humbuggers to da’ humdingers;
  • Pendant vs Watch Pros and Cons;
  • How to choose the Right SIM card.

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

Konnnekt captioning videophone; Incredibly easy to use for senoirs or disability, reduces depression risk – John Nakulski – Konnekt

An epidemic of social isolation is sweeping Australia. Over-75s with hearing loss are at grave risk of depression and dementia. Medical research shows: Face-to-face conversation is critical!
The Konnekt Captioning Videophone, launched in 2020, is an incredibly easy phone and video phone for hearing-impaired seniors and those with disabilities – even dementia. Captions are huge, fast and contextually corrected by A.I. Users can also read lips, faces and emotions.
Learn when to recommend Konnekt versus older technologies, and why it’s government funded. Hear how 91-year-old Emma won back independence, enabling her to live independently and see her interstate grandkids daily.

14:00-14:30

 

Bariatric Seating and Mobility Considerations – Nick Reginato – ILS Rehab

This session will look at the different bariatric body shapes and how these can influence seating and mobility prescription. The associated risks to this population will be outlined, and the importance of utilising a specialised seating assessment to address these issues. We will explore what management techniques can be utilised to reduce the risk to this population through appropriate wheelchair and seating prescription, as well as review relevant assistive technological advancements aimed at facilitating independent mobility and community participation.

  ROOM 3
9:00-10:00

 

Best practise guidelines for assessment and selection of rehab shower commode chair – Lois Brown – ILS Rehab, Catherine Young & Kim Vien – Royal Melbourne Hospital

This presentation will review the clinical guidelines and considerations for the management of skin integrity and postural control beyond the client’s functional mobility device. Differentiation and clinical decision making to differentiate from minimal adjustment, to fully configured to custom molded commodes will be discussed.   Specific anthropometric body measures will be reviewed specific to determining the aperture, dimensions and location of access of the commode seat that are relevant to the design and fit of the commode seat.  Assessment of postural presentation of the pelvis will be addressed as well as considerations for pressure redistribution for low, moderate and high-risk clients.  The application of interface pressure mapping will be demonstrated and discussed as part of the assessment process.

10:00-10:30 TBA
11:00-11:45

 

Aquatic Therapy & Transfer Tips for Caregivers – Craig Slattery – Para Mobility & Kristen Kruse – AustSwim

Having appropriate, safe, dignified access to a Pool ensures using correct equipment use: 

  • Manual handling safety for Participant and Carer
  • Access to water for personal, social and community participation
  • Provides opportunities for independence, water therapy and exercise

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

One switch, many devices, no problem – Emma Hughes – Zyteq

More people are using multiple devices for different activities throughout the day. If you have an iPad/tablet, laptop and a smart TV and need to be able to access them with only one switch, how can you control them all independently? This presentation demonstrates a solution to achieve control of multiple devices with a single switch to successfully navigate between devices depending on what you want to do.   Our case story shows a common situation where someone has the power to use her devices to make the changes she wants whenever she wants to without having to ask for help.

14:00-14:30

 

Navigating the NDIS assistive technology process: Case studies and panel discussion – Claire Fox – National 360

The introduction of the NDIS has resulted in significant changes to the role of community Occupational Therapists and the way in which they prescribe assistive technology. This is often a complex process as the OT navigates their client’s needs against the NDIS reasonable and necessary criteria, classification of equipment and plan management types. This session will explore how National 360 have navigated this process using case examples and a panel discussion with the audience. The aim of this session is to discuss barriers and facilitators to successful AT prescription and explore the NDIS guidelines which impact this.

*Details subject to change

  ROOM 4
9:00-9:30

Using power seat functions to improve quality of lifeAmy Bjornson – Sunrise Medical

Prescribing Power Seat Functions on Power Wheelchairs:
Assessment Considerations and Programming to Increase Utilisation and User Comfort
This session will discuss:
* What the evidence tells us about skin and posture/comfort protection
* How we can influence usage to improve clinical outcomes
* Considering the interaction between the seating and power positioning features
* Matching clinical need with power seating functions
* Questions we should be asking in the assessment to guide our advice

10:00-10:30

 

When Innovation meets Best Clinical Practice: Introducing the New Explorer Mini – Rachel Fabiniak – Permobil

The Mini Explorer is the newest early paediatric powered mobility device designed with evidence-based research for best practice. A study by Dugan et al. in 2006 took a survey of 424 early intervention professionals and found that only 7% considered introducing powered mobility before 24 months of age. This number is startling considering the well documented and known implications of delayed self-directed mobility. However, even if we introduce powered mobility at a younger age, what should this age be? How do we know what type of device we should be recommending? This 25-minute product innovation session will discuss the key components based on motor development that should be integrated into a powered mobility device for assisting with both mobility and motor development.

11:00-11:45

 Proposed changes to the building code and the impact on the home – Jane Bringolf – Centre for Universal Design

The Australian Building Codes Board’s Accessible Housing project will have a Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) ready for public comment in April. It is based on analysing the costs and benefits of Silver and Gold levels of the Livable Housing Australia Guidelines.
If the proposed changes to the building code are mandated it will be a landmark day for Australian housing. This presentation will cover the rationale and explain the important parts of the RIS. It will discuss the implications for home mods and related AT and how organisations and individuals can participate in community feedback.

12:00-13:00 LUNCH
13:00-13:30

 

Importance of the seated microclimate in skin protection, how much do we need to consider heat, moisture and humidity? – Amy Bjornson – Sunrise Medical

Pressure ulcers are a common among wheelchair users.  Studies indicate as many as 95% of Spinal clients will experience a pressure injury in their lifetime.  While we’re very good at managing the sustained mechanical loading (pressure)  and deformation of the skin and subcutaneous layers between internal anatomical structures and wheelchair surface (shear), the skin’s microclimate (temperature, humidity and airflow next to the skin surface) is also an indirect pressure ulcer risk factor. Temperature and humidity affect skin’s structure and function which can impact the its ability to tolerate deformation. This session will discuss the biomechanics of skin, look at the current and pending research and consider how we can utilize reduction in moisture, humidity and temperature to fully protect our clients from pressure injuries.    

14:00-14:30

 

Using the Allen Cognitive Disability Model to improve the efficiency of equipment prescription – Susan Pordage – Acdm Web

Have you ever been in the situation where you were given a referral to prescribe a piece of equipment for a client, you go through the process, the equipment is prescribed and delivered but despite the equipment being physically appropriate, it is not being used properly? You wondered what has just happened? Why is the person not using the equipment despite everyone’s best intention? My answer to this conundrum is often, have you considered the person’s cognition?

Understanding Cognition Using the Allen Cognitive Levels

Claudia Allen was an American OT who developed a conceptual framework to understand cognition. It is based on Piaget’s childhood growth and development. It is an ordinal scale where the measurements are in a set order but these are not equal intervals. Establishing a pattern of performance is how the scale is used to describe how the person processes information.

Clinical Instructional Short Session

Clinical Plenary Long Session

Consumer

Product Innovation

AT Developments